How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 7 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/9/19 12:01 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

In this probably-final entry in the series, I'd like to muse a bit about possible future improvements and additions to the compiler and the NSF ODP Tooling generally. For the most part, the big-ticket future additions seek to answer one question: Could this be used to replace Designer?

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 6 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/8/19 12:03 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

In this post, I'd like to go over another main component of the NSF ODP Tooling project, the ODP Exporter. The exporter is significantly simpler than the compiler, but still had a surprising number of gotchas of its own. My goal in writing the exporter was to replace the need to use Designer to create an on-disk project out of an NSF.

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 5 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/6/19 9:23 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

One of the things that came up frequently when writing both the compiler and exporter portions of the NSF ODP Tooling was rationalizing the multiple ways an NSF is viewed, and determining which aspects are reified in the design notes themselves and which are entirely runtime conjurations.

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 4 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/3/19 11:35 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

In today's post, I'd like to go over a bit of how the NSF ODP Tooling project is organized, and specifically how I structured it to support both server-based and local compilation. Setting aside the feature, update site, and distribution modules, the tooling consists of seventeen code-bearing components.

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 3 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/3/19 12:43 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

In the first two posts in this series, I focused on the XPages compilation and runtime environment, independent of anything to do with an NSF specifically. I'll return to the world of OSGi and servlets in later entries, but I'd like to take a bit of time to talk about some specifics of grafting the compiled XPage results and the rest of the on-disk project's contents into an actual NSF.

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 2 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/2/19 12:02 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

In yesterday's post, I briefly touched on how the XPages runtime sees its environment by way of a FacesProject and related components. Today, I'd like to expand on that a bit, since it's useful to understand the various layers of what makes up an "XPages app" at compilation and runtimes. Designer and Domino largely take two paths to try to arrive at the same location in how they view an NSF.

How the ODP Compiler Works, Part 1 

By Jesse Gallagher | 7/1/19 12:15 AM | App Dev - XPages | Added by John Oldenburger

A year ago, I started a project to compile NSFs - and particularly large XPages projects - independently of Designer. Since the initial releases, the project has grown, gaining an ODP exporter, extra Eclipse UI integration, and the ability to run without installing components on a remote server. It's become an integral part of my workflow with several projects, where I include the NSFs as part of a large Maven build alongside OSGi plugins and a final distribution.